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Q&A Apply unsharp mask before or after downsizing to final size?

1 answer  ·  posted over 1 year ago by Canina‭  ·  last activity over 1 year ago by Olin Lathrop‭

#3: Post edited by user avatar Canina‭ · 2021-05-24T16:16:26Z (over 1 year ago)
  • Pretty much what the title says. For sharpening photos out of a DSLR, where the final result will be at a lower size compared to the DSLR's output (for example, for publishing on the web), **is it better to:**
  • * apply (possibly slightly more) unsharp mask, then downsize? *or*
  • * downsize, then apply unsharp mask to taste at the final image size?
  • I'm looking for what produces the most visually appealing output -- clearer details than in the comparatively soft DSLR image, but not oversharpened.
  • Intuitively, it's easier to get the right amount of unsharp mask with the image at the final size (because one can immediately judge the results); but does this deprive the filter of data that could have been used to produce a better-looking result?
  • For sharpening photos out of a DSLR, where the final result will be at a lower size compared to the DSLR's output (for example, for publishing on the web), **is it better to:**
  • * apply (possibly slightly more) unsharp mask, then downsize? *or*
  • * downsize, then apply unsharp mask to taste at the final image size?
  • I'm looking for what produces the most visually appealing output -- clearer details than in the comparatively soft DSLR image, but not oversharpened.
  • Intuitively, it's easier to get the right amount of unsharp mask with the image at the final size (because one can immediately judge the results); but does this deprive the filter of data that could have been used to produce a better-looking result?
#2: Post edited by user avatar Canina‭ · 2021-05-24T16:11:49Z (over 1 year ago)
  • Pretty much what the title says. For sharpening photos out of a DSLR, where the final result will be at a lower size compared to the DSLR's output, **is it better to:**
  • * apply (possibly slightly more) unsharp mask, then downsize? *or*
  • * downsize, then apply unsharp mask to taste at the final image size?
  • I'm looking for what produces the most visually appealing output -- clearer details than in the comparatively soft DSLR image, but not oversharpened.
  • Intuitively, it's easier to get the right amount of unsharp mask with the image at the final size (because one can immediately judge the results); but does this deprive the filter of data that could have been used to produce a better-looking result?
  • Pretty much what the title says. For sharpening photos out of a DSLR, where the final result will be at a lower size compared to the DSLR's output (for example, for publishing on the web), **is it better to:**
  • * apply (possibly slightly more) unsharp mask, then downsize? *or*
  • * downsize, then apply unsharp mask to taste at the final image size?
  • I'm looking for what produces the most visually appealing output -- clearer details than in the comparatively soft DSLR image, but not oversharpened.
  • Intuitively, it's easier to get the right amount of unsharp mask with the image at the final size (because one can immediately judge the results); but does this deprive the filter of data that could have been used to produce a better-looking result?
#1: Initial revision by user avatar Canina‭ · 2021-05-24T16:11:07Z (over 1 year ago)
Apply unsharp mask before or after downsizing to final size?
Pretty much what the title says. For sharpening photos out of a DSLR, where the final result will be at a lower size compared to the DSLR's output, **is it better to:**

 * apply (possibly slightly more) unsharp mask, then downsize? *or*
 * downsize, then apply unsharp mask to taste at the final image size?

I'm looking for what produces the most visually appealing output -- clearer details than in the comparatively soft DSLR image, but not oversharpened.

Intuitively, it's easier to get the right amount of unsharp mask with the image at the final size (because one can immediately judge the results); but does this deprive the filter of data that could have been used to produce a better-looking result?